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Fixtures, Fittings, and Furniture

BIM for Architecture, Engineering, and Construction Curriculum

Exercise 1.5.1: Modeling In-Place Components

In this exercise, students will learn how to:

  • Use the Model In-Place tool to create project specific custom forms.
  • Create simple extruded shapes and set the extrusion’s thickness and material properties.
  • Combine and resize extruded shapes to model common building elements, such as furniture objects.
Figure 1.5.1 - Using the In-Place editor to model counters by extrusions

Video Tutorial



Student Exercise

Download Unit1_Lesson5_Exercise1_Start.zip: Imperial or Metric
Revit
  • Open the Ground Floor plan view of the project model.
  • Create an in-place component to model a dining room table that fits the unique triangular geometry of the walls.
    • Create the table using two separate extrusions: one for the table base and another for the table top. The table top should be 4-inches thick with its top surface located 32 inches off the floor. The table base should extend from the floor to the bottom of the table top.
    • Choose a material for these extrusions that is similar to cherry wood.
  • Use the Place Component tool to place chair components of type Barrel around the custom table as shown in Figure 1.5.2.

 

Figure 1.5.2 - In-place component for dining table with barrel chairs placed around it

  • Model a custom-shaped bed as an in-place component for the nonrectangular master bedroom as shown in Figure 1.5.3. Since the bed needs to conform to the irregular geometry of the walls, it requires a custom component.
  • Model this in-place component using three extruded shapes to represent the following parts: the bed platform, the mattress, and the headboard.
  • Use void forms to cut openings in the headboard for books and bedsides accessories.

 

Figure 1.5.3 - In-place component for bed in master bedroom

Exercise 1.5.2: Modifying a Family Definition

In this exercise, students will learn how to:

  • Utilize existing component families to adapt them for new uses.
  • Add new forms to the families and change the instance parameters.
  • Assign new materials and dimension properties.
  • Define new component family types and load them into a project.
Figure 1.5.4 - Defining new bed types by adapting an existing object

Video Tutorial



Student Exercise

Download Unit1_Lesson5_Exercise2_Start.zip: Imperial or Metric
Revit Architecture 2011
  • Edit the family of the floor lamp near the sofa in the living room of the residence to create a new one with a mid-century modern look.
  • Modify the lamp shade form:
    • Save the component family using a new name to avoid overwriting the original. Name the new component Floor Lamp – Modern.
    • Delete the center pole element, which is defined as an extrusion
    • Select the lamp shade, which is defined as a revolve
  • Open the front elevation view, and edit the revolve. Change the sketch of the boundary lines to create a funnel shape as shown in Figure 1.5.5.

 

Figure 1.5.5 - Updated boundary sketch and revolved form for lamp shade

  • Modify the lamp base form:
    • Select the lamp base, which is also defined as a revolve.
    • Open the front elevation view again, and edit the revolve. Change the sketch of the boundary lines to create a cylinder shape as shown in Figure 1.5.6.

 

Figure 1.5.6 - Updated boundary sketch and revolved form for lamp base

  • Add three legs to support the lamp shade:
    • Open the front elevation view again, and create a new solid extrusion.
    • Sketch boundary lines that meet the sides of the lamp shade and lamp base as shown in Figure 1.5.7.
    • Set the extrusion start to -1/2" and the extrusion end to 1/2" to create a 1" thick leg.
    • Finish the extrusion.
    • Open plan view and use the Array tool to create a radial array of 3 legs spaced evenly around the center of the lamp (with a rotation of 120 degrees between the elements).

 

Figure 1.5.7 - Boundary sketch for leg extrusion and radial array of 3 legs supporting lamp shade

  • Modify the light source definition to match the new lamp shape:
    • Select the current light source definition, which is also defined as a hemisphere.
    • Open the Light Source Definition tool and choose to emit light using the line shape and the spherical light distribution pattern.
    • Open the front elevation view again, and select the light source element.
    • Unlock the constraints on the light source, and rotate it 90 degrees. Then move the center of the light source down 2' as shown in Figure 1.5.8.

 

Figure 1.5.8 - Updated shape and placement of light source

  • Assign materials for the lamp shade, base, and legs:
    • Open the Materials dialog box, and duplicate the Default material. Name this new material Modern Lamp Base, and assign a brown color as the shading to represent wood.
    • Duplicate the Glass – Frosted material and name the new material Modern Lamp Shade.
    • Open the 3D view and select each of these elements to assign their materials in the Properties palette.
    • If the leg elements are in a group (created during the array operation), select one leg and edit the group. The material assigned to one leg will automatically be used by all legs.
  • Save your work and use the Load into Project tool to load the new component into your project.

 

Figure 1.5.9 - Completed modern lamp component

Exercise 1.5.3: Creating New Families

In this exercise, students will learn how to:

  • Use the family editor to add reference planes, dimensions, and parameters.
  • Test parameters and define family types.
  • Create forms, set constraints, and assign materials to forms.
  • Save, load, and place instances of a custom component family.
Figure 1.5.10 - Testing custom component parameters

Video Tutorial



Student Exercise

Download Unit1_Lesson5_Exercise3_Start.zip: Imperial or Metric
Revit
  • Modify the console table component created in the tutorial by editing the family to add additional parametric features. Change the tabletop from a 4" slab of a single material to two pieces—a table surface and a table frame whose thickness and height can be resized parametrically.
  • Start by adding reference planes and parameters to control the thickness of the frame:
    • Open the reference level plan view.
    • Add new reference planes on all four sides of the table. Place these 1" away from the existing reference planes that define the tabletop boundary toward the center of the table as shown in Figure 1.5.11. It may be helpful to use the Pick Lines tool to place these planes using a 1" offset from the existing planes.
    • Add a dimension from the existing reference plane to the new one on each side of the table
    • Select one of the dimensions and add a parameter named Frame Thickness. This should be a type parameter of type length grouped under the Dimensions section of the properties.
    • Select the remaining 3 dimensions and set the Frame Thickness parameter as the label for each of them.

 

Figure 1.5.11 - New reference planes controlled by Frame Thickness parameter

  • Add an opening to the existing tabletop extrusion to create the table frame:
    • Select the existing tabletop extrusion and edit it.
    • Sketch a new rectangular boundary inside the existing one to create an opening.
    • Align the edges of this new opening to the reference planes and lock them in place.

 

Figure 1.5.12 - Sketch of opening creating the table frame

  • Create a new extrusion to model the table surface using a solid extrusion with a rectangular boundary that is constrained (locked) with the reference planes.
    • Open the Solid Extrusion tool.
    • Sketch a new rectangular boundary inside the frame.
    • Align the edges of this new extrusion to the reference planes and lock them in place.

 

Figure 1.5.13 - Sketch of table surface within frame

  • Add reference planes and add parameters to control the height of the table frame, the table surface, and the pedestal base:
    • Open the front elevation view.
    • Add new reference planes about 1" below the existing reference plane that defines the top of the table as shown in Figure 1.5.14.
    • Add a dimension from the existing reference plane to the new one.
    • Select this dimension and add a parameter named Surface Thickness. This should be a type parameter of type length grouped under the Dimensions section of the properties.
    • Select the existing dimension that controls the thickness of the tabletop and add a parameter to it named Frame Height. This should also be a type parameter of type length grouped under the Dimensions section of the properties.

 

Figure 1.5.14 - New reference plane and parameters to control thickness of table frame and surface

  • Lock the top and bottom surfaces of the extrusions to these reference planes:
    • Switch to the wireframe visual style to see all three extrusions clearly.
    • Align the top of the table surface extrusion to the table top reference plane and lock it.
    • Align the bottom of the table surface extrusion to the middle reference plane and lock it.
    • Align the top of the pedestal base extrusion to the middle reference plane and lock it.
    • The table frame should already be locked in place, because it was created by modifying an existing form.
  • Assign a material to the table surface and add a new instance parameter to enable users to dynamically change this material:
    • Open the 3D view and select the table surface form.
    • Click the small button that appears in the material value field to open the Materials dialog box, and choose Glass as the default material for this form.
    • Click the small button that appears to the right of the material value field and add a new parameter to control this material setting.
    • Name the parameter Table Surface, and define the parameter to be an instance parameter of type Materials grouped under the Materials and Finishes section of the properties.
  • Save the family and load the new component into your project.
    • Duplicate an existing type to create several new types with different sizes by experimenting with the parametric dimensions. Change the proportions of the table frame and the pedestal base to model a wide range tables, benches, and similar objects.
    • Place several instances in your project, and assign different materials to the table frame, table surface, and pedestal base for each instance to vary the resulting look and application.

 

Figure 1.5.15 - Two instances of the console table component placed in the residence showing different sizes (type properties) and materials (instance properties)