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CEE 120B/220B

Building Systems Integration | Winter 2015

11 February 2016

Design Journal Entry 4

CEE 220B | Ryan Edwards

Below are the average and record monthly temperatures for Dallas. You can see that in the summer, the low temperatures are above the normal comfort zone while in the winter, the high temperatures are below the comfort zone. My inference from this was that thermal mass in my building would not necessarily be a good idea. During the summer, thermal mass would continue warming above the comfort zone while it would maintain a cold temperature at night during winter months. Based on daily temperature profiles, it seemed that the lowest temperatures throughout the day were actually in the morning while the highest temperatures occured later in the afternoon. Thus, in order to get artificial daylight into the middle of the building without accumulating too much heat, I thought it would be prudent to place an east facing skylight in the middle of the building. Furthermore, the basketball court to the south of the building will shade the building from unwanted solar radiation. Even though it will also shade the building during winter months, there is not much of a loss due to somewhat higher temperatures in the winter. I am still not satisfied with the layout of the rooms in my building as well as the placement of bathrooms and mechanical and electrical rooms. I am hoping to get those things fixed in the next couple days along with lighting and energy studies. Please see the link attached for my model.

09 February 2016

Design Journal Entry 3

CEE 220B | Ryan Edwards

I have become somewhat discouraged in the design of my building, because I feel as if it is not as aesthetically pleasing as it should be. As an engineer I have been trained to solve problems and optimize that solution. I find that the methods that I use to do this are not productive in producing an aesthetically pleasing building. Optimizing something's aesthetics seems to be a problem that has no scientific or algorithmic solution. I feel like I have been waiting for a lightningbolt of creativity or devine epiphany to hit me, but it hasn't come and I have become somewhat behind in my design. Finally I decided to simply take a whack at it and try it using good ole reason. the result was that it was not exactly an elegant start, but hopefully functional. I began by listing the specific uses that I wanted to get out of the building. The following were some things that I considered making space for in my building: Men's home/halfway house which included sleeping quarters for the men showering/bathroom space manager living quarters living room area other residential necessities (small kitchen, dining room, etc.) machine shop wood shop Computer lab Classroom space Study space nursery/early childhood care space basketball court locker rooms auditorium music venue energy efficiency technology showcase industrial kitchen musical practice rooms (sound proof) After making this list, I tried to group things together that might be conducive to utilizing the same space. This way I could optimize the space that I had by utilizing the same space for different uses that didn't overlap. For instance, one space could be used for class rooms and study space. Some things were more difficult, however. There was no good way to utilize a men's home for multiple purposes. In fact, the men's home really wasn't conducive to any of the other things that I wanted to do in my building, so I eventually removed it from consideration. In this way, I narrowed down the uses that I watned in the building and produced a general plan for which spaces could have multiple uses and how these uses needed to be separated spacially. For instance, it would make no sense to place the nursury next to the machine shop. The baby's would never be able to sleep! The following pictures include my rough sketches of the blueprint of my building

Existing Building Sketch

From this point. I started working in Revit. That work will be uploaded in my next Design Journal

28 January 2016

Design Journal Entry 2

CEE 220B | Ryan Edwards

The majority of my time spent on this class this week was troubleshooting Revit. I have added more detail to the potential layout of the building in Formit (See attached link). Next week I will form the building in Revit (now that I have it working). It has become a rather large building, but much of it will be taken up by the basketball court on the south side of the lot. It would be much more energy efficient to make this an outdoor court, even if it had a covering, but this would limit the ability to use this space as a concert/sermon area. However, this could be overcome by utilizing the existing structure (the middle building) as an area for this use.

23 April 2015

Living Lab Journal Entry #3

CEE 220B | Maria Martinez

This past week I started working on my building components. I already had created an initial shell on week two, which I used to start modeling the flow of the building.  I also started implementing my initial passive design ideas and running an energy analysis to have an idea of how my building should be improved.

19 March 2015

Journal Entry Final - Part 1

CEE 220B | Alanna Dedek

Journal Entry Final - Part 1

Architectural & Structural Features

Interiors

Trombe Wall

Daylighting Analysis



19 March 2015

Journal Entry Final - Part 2

CEE 220B | Alanna Dedek

Journal Entry Final - Part 2

Exterior Features

Recycled Copper Siding

Courtyard

Light Shelf

Natural Ventilation

Pervious Pavement

Rain Garden

Green Roof

19 March 2015

Journal Entry Final - Part 3

CEE 220B | Alanna Dedek

Journal Entry Final - Part 3

MEP Systems

HVAC 

Plumbing 

Sprinkers

15 March 2015

Journal Entry 5

CEE 220B | Alanna Dedek

Journal Entry 5

Plumbing and HVAC systems have started descending into the model. With time constraints, the rest of the plumbing and HVAC will have to wait!  The HVAC system focuses on the open floor plan, keeping the ceilings open in all exhibit and hall areas to showcase the building systems. The supply and return terminals are on the ducts themselves in these areas.  A mechanical room holds the air handling unit, and a small shaft to the floor below will allow Level 1 HVAC ducts to also feed into this unit.  One handling unit will be placed in each building wing. Calculations were performed on the individual spaces to determine the appropriate air flow for the occupancy. 

Challenges with the plumbing system were numerous. Unlinking sanitary from greywater and attaching all plumbing fixtures from appropriate views was difficult. Vertical pipes kept hitting each other, and I had to be creative with routing the sanitary system around the greywater. Fortunately, this space is the back corner of the kitchen, so having exposed pipes or losing a small area (enclosing it with drywall) is not an issue.  The greywater system will fill a tank and will be reused for irrigation during dry times. Rainwater, as minimal as it is in California, will drain straight off the roof into rain gardens and water the plants. 

To-do:
-Lighting system
-HVAC VAV boxes
-Sizing ducts
-Fire sprinklers
-Attach greywater to water tanks

01 March 2015

Journal Entry 4

CEE 220B | Alanna Dedek

Journal Entry 4

I have completed my structural system, adding beam systems to fill in space and placing architectural columns to cover the raw steel. I chose steel because of the heavy soil on the green roofs and solar panels. My ceilings will be open to expose MEP systems and steel infrastructure, allowing people to interact more closely with the building. 

I also added several sustainable elements, including light shelves, a Trombe wall, and rain gardens.  The Trombe wall is made of a curtain wall surrounded by plywood and opening components in the building exterior wall. Ideally, guests inside the exhibit will be able to examine this wall from the inside, then view it and the green roof from the terrace. 

I also detailed further the outdoor classroom in the back of the complex.  This area can be used for nature talks, potting classes, and any other messy activities that should not be inside.

21 February 2015

Check-In 3

CEE 220B | Alanna Dedek

Check-In 3

I added windows and plumbing fixture to doors, as well as refined my room schedule to obtain a total square footage of 14,914 SF.  

Moving around and adapting the walls to the structural grids proved more difficult than expected.  Creating a robust model is the biggest issue at this time.  I want to ensure that I have the groundwork for adding building systems to the model without needing to alter wall locations and placement.  I am uncertain at this time how to support the roof load and add structural members to the sloped roof. 

My daylighting analysis is shown.  At 9am, 69% is within the lighting threshold, and at 3pm, this jumps to 77%. Adding light shelves will allow this light to be distributed more evenly, rather than concentrating at the base of the windows. 

More extensive lighting analysis, egress analysis, and structural members will be performed to optimize the design.

20 February 2015

Architectural and Structural Design

CEE 220B | Akshay Vajpayee

Architectural and Structural Design

Concrete construction with Reinforced columns and beams.


Concrete multilayered exterior walls for insulation and dry walls in the interior with gypsum layers.

10 February 2015

Check-In 2

CEE 220B | Alanna Dedek

Check-In 2

The summer solar study (attached) shows the surfaces with the highest solar exposure. Solar panels will be placed on the roofs, specifically the southwest facing roof that gets a large amount of sun in both the summer and the winter.  I plan to install Trombe walls on opaque walls facing the southeast where the winter sun is high and use them in the exhibits to show their effect on building heating.

All opaque walls are designed with concrete, a high thermal mass material to store heat during the day and release it at night.  With the Bay Area’s large daily temperature fluctuations, using high thermal mass materials can reduce the building energy needs. In this case, cast-in-place concrete walls are recommended.  The exterior cladding will be copper for architectural purposes, mimicking the copper from my inspiration post. An air space, waterproofing membrane, and insulation are all included in the exterior wall layers. 

Central courtyard walls will be curtain walls, letting in indirect light entering the canyon between the buildings. Light fins and shelves will be further refined using the curtain wall systems.  Shelves on windows along the exterior will allow light to bounce off of the sloped ceilings on the second floor, lighting the exhibit space and offices. An interesting feature is the transparent bridge between building wings.  This area will be a demonstration space for the effects of daylighting.  

The roof will overhang, acting as a sun shade for curtain walls on all sides of the building. The roof above the lobby will be a walk-out roof from both building wings, and around the corner of the west wing will be a green roof, allowing visitors to physically see and interact with the plantings.  This area is shielded from westerly winds, giving an oasis from winter winds and a pleasant area to have outdoor meetings.  Additionally, the buildings surrounding the courtyard shield it from winds. 

The roof also slopes downward towards the outside, routing water into rain gardens surrounding the perimeter of the building. This water will be collected and reused for landscape irrigation. Every effort is made to ensure that the space stays open from one side to another, letting the wind ventilate the building from west to east.  

26 January 2015

Check-In 1

CEE 120B | Kevin Anderson

Check-In 1

The overall idea of the design is to have the building blend into the 
environment. With the location on a hillside, the north facing side will only have one story above ground. Overall, there will be four stories; one above ground and the rest will be built into the side of the hill. This will hopefully allow for the building not stand out too much.

There will be a great deal of outdoor areas to allow for the teachers, students and workers to spend part of their day outdoors. There will be two decks that can be used as gathering spaces. There will also be a rooftop garden/park that will accomplish the same goals as the decks, but also help the building fit into the environment. The garden roof will also provide great thermal efficiency. Right now, I have the structure set up to face the south in hopes of having the most sunlight for the decks. However, with sunlight, come thermal gains. I am goingto do a couple of sunlight and thermal models to analyze whether or not it would be practical to face south. The goal is to make the building thermally efficient enough to be able to face south. This is a very rough and broad design idea, but it is something that I can build off of and continue to grow.

26 January 2015

Check-In 1

CEE 220B | Alanna Dedek

Check-In 1

Attached are photos of my preliminary designs for my building. I focus on utilizing summer winds for ventilation, making sure my building is not wider than the recommended 45' maximum for natural ventilation. I am thinking of two, two-story structures with a shaded courtyard and sloping roofs for solar panels and rainwater harvesting. The crossing structure through the center courtyard can mainly be glass to overlook the surroundings, as it it shaded by the buildings on either side.

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