Joshua Dimasaka

Summary

My structural system is made of reinforced concrete beams, walls, and columns. This makes the job easier because the size of the beam can be changed after considering any changes in the rebar first. I identified the beam size 500 mm x 700 mm to be the most critical because of its very long span although it has relatively manageable loading on it.

The size 500 mm by 700 mm might need to be increased because the structural analysis did not involve any lateral analysis. Lateral analysis with wind and seismic loading will definitely increase the flexural demand for this beam system, which is connected to the core wall itself. The core wall will absorb a lot of seismic force demand and the first who will receive it will be the 500 mm x 700 mm beam system. I think the increase in beam shape will be in terms of depth with an increase of 300 mm (maximum). Nonetheless, these beams are located on the lobbies which do not have architectural requirements such as partition or mechanical pipes.

One of the structural challenges here was the very long beams. I want to see the demand-capacity ratio of these beams when I incorporate the seismic/wind force. Still, the exercise was a good practice to be familiarized with linking Revit and Robot.

Some personal challenges I encountered were

(1) I didn't notice that it's only three beams that we need to do, 😢 and I initially modeled the entire structure and put the load on it. So, I just continued working on it instead of starting it again. I still highlighted the three beams below. 🙂

(2) I tried to use the ETABS and I found out that you need to have the CSIxRevit2021, not CSIxRevit2020 because I'm using Revit 2021. The Stanford Wizard Installation does not have the CSIxRevit2021, so I just used a free trial version of it to see what would happen. Unfortunately, some live loads are not fully exported and reflected in the ETABS model. So, I just used the Robot instead.

(3) I also found and tried this plug-in but it did not export the loads. https://apps.autodesk.com/RVT/en/Detail/Index?id=1038987099408283844&appLang=en&os=Win64

Finally, the computed beam sizes will consume some space for HVAC design elements such as piping systems. Hence, it's important to see any clashes between HVAC and structural systems. I think Revit can incorporate the required angle of bending for pipes. I'm sure that some beams might need to adjust or to move to allow the piping system to be connected efficiently too.

Robot

Revit

Three Critical Beams

Beam ID 22: Above the Conference/Auditorium
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Beam ID 148: Above One of the Main Office Rooms (similar position as Beam 22)
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Beam ID 140: Between Two Core Walls
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Beam ID 140: Between Two Core Walls
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Global Analysis (Visuals)

Click to see details
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Gravity Loading

UseSuperimposed Dead Load (psf)Live Load (psf)
Corridors, Stairs, Lobbies
40
100
Mechanical, Electrical
50
150
Roof Deck
80
40
Toilet
110
60
Office
97.77
100.03
Curtain Wall
12